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Koningsdag

Edgar’s blog: Kingsday aka ”Koningsdag”

Kingsday aka (Koningsdag)

Orange as an Orange, Koningsdag (King’s day in the Netherlands!)

On the 27th of April all the dutch peeps celebrate the birthday of the King of the Netherlands. Kingsday (Koningsdag) or Queensday is an old tradition to celebrate the birth of the reigning king or queen. It is a public holiday so everyone gets a day off. You are allowed to sell freely on the streets. No permit required. All ages and all types selling everything from toys to sofas to cannabis plants.

Across the whole country Kingsday (Koningsdag) is a big party “Het Oranje feest”.  King Willem and his family visit selected towns and villages around the country and join in with the fun, eat orange cakes, drink orange drinks and play orange games.

All very cool those markets and festivals but what makes Kingsday (Koningsdag) so special is that the whole nation is decorated or dressed in ORANGE, with a little bit of red, white and blue. It’s like carnival but totally orange. You are probably wondering why the hell ORANGE … that comes from the surname of the Dutch royal family, Van Oranje.  Literally translated: From Orange. So the Dutch want everything orange this day except for one thing… their beer. That should be yellow but definitely there!

Join these crazy Dutch folks with Orange socks and an Orange pair of sunglasses! And just be as Orange as an Orange.

In name of the King. Hoera, hoera, hoeraaa!

Be a King! Buy my royal socks.

Edgar's Blog. Halloween. Turtle pumpkin

Edgar’s Blog: Halloween

The origins of Halloween

Modern Halloween has become less about literal ghosts and ghouls and more about costumes and sweeties. However, Halloween’s origins date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in). The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom and northern France, celebrated their new year on November 1. This day marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark, cold winter, a time of year that was often associated with human death. Celts believed that on the night before the new year, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead became blurred. On the night of October 31 they celebrated Samhain, when it was believed that the ghosts of the dead returned to earth.

People gathered with the druids to build bonfires and to burn crops and animals as sacrifices to the Celtic deities. During the celebration, the Celts wore costumes, typically consisting of animal heads and skins, and attempted to tell each other’s fortunes. When the celebration was over, they re-lit their hearth fires, which they had extinguished earlier that evening, from the sacred bonfire to help protect them during the coming winter.

 

The Romans arrived and their ceremony to remember the dead, also in October, was incorporated with the Celtic one of Samhain.  After that with the arrival of Christianity, All Souls Day was also absorbed. This ceremony was celebrated in a similar fashion to Samhain; bonfires and dressing up as saints, angels and devils. This ceremony was also called All Hallows and finally the Celtic and Christian ceremonies merged into All Hallows Eve and eventually Halloween.

 

With the movement of European immigrants into America the traditions of Halloween were transferred across the Atlantic. Today the Americans celebrate Halloween big style. Try a trip to New York around this day. Great to get involved!

Don’t want to dress up like a ghost? I made a special Halloween sock box! Bloody red and pumpkin orange socks. You can still celebrate but just a bit more subtle.

Buy the Halloween sock box! 

 

Cheers and pumpkins Edgar